‘We are all in this together’: Farmers in rural Queensland report drought threat

In the southern suburbs of Brisbane, residents are fighting back against the worst drought in decades, but a recent report by the Agriculture Research Service shows that a similar drought is only just beginning.

The ABC understands that farmers in the region are still experiencing the worst conditions in decades.

A drought-related alert was issued on Tuesday, with the warning that “there is a real and imminent threat of drought”.

The ABC has not been able to confirm if the drought is linked to the coronavirus outbreak.

“The threat of a severe drought in the Southern Brisbane region is real,” the report said.

The ABC spoke to a number of farmers who said they were fighting to stay in business despite the risk of a devastating drought. “

If the drought continues, then the situation will be much worse than it is today.”

The ABC spoke to a number of farmers who said they were fighting to stay in business despite the risk of a devastating drought.

The National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) has said it will “take every measure to protect the livelihoods of farmers and businesses in the drought-hit Southern Queensland region”.

But farmers and other industry experts are not buying the NFF’s explanation.

They say there is a risk that the situation could become worse.

“I think that’s all speculation at this point,” National Farmers Federation spokesman Michael McKeever said.

“[There’s] no evidence at this stage that the drought in Southern Queensland is anything like it was 10 years ago.”

The NFF has been warning of the drought for some time.

The NSW Government last month announced it would increase agricultural production in drought-affected areas, warning of “unprecedented” crop losses.

But Mr McKeiver said farmers in Northern Queensland were still fighting for survival.

“That’s where we are in Queensland,” he said.

ABC Rural Business’ Rural Business podcast: Why are farmers fighting the drought?

Listen to the full podcast below.

‘We’re all in it together’ Rural Queensland farmer Kevin Taylor, who is also a farmer, said the drought had impacted farmers in his region.

“People are still being affected by the drought,” he told the ABC.

It’s all of us together.” “

But we’re all still in this Together.

It’s all of us together.”

Mr Taylor said he had not been surprised by the NFVD’s report.

“A lot of us have been in this drought for a while,” he explained.

Farmers in the state are expected to suffer a major drop in crop yields in the coming weeks. “

It’s really a shock, really.”

Farmers in the state are expected to suffer a major drop in crop yields in the coming weeks.

Farmers are also already warning of damage to infrastructure.

“Farmers in rural Australia are in a state of emergency right now,” the National Farmers Union (NFU) said in a statement.

Farmers are not the only ones facing the drought. “

More than 70 per cent of the land that they’ve got on their farm is gone, and it’s a devastating blow to the entire community.”

Farmers are not the only ones facing the drought.

“At least 10,000 hectares of land are lost in Queensland every year due to droughts,” National Farmer’s Federation spokesperson Michael McKeeffe said.

The Queensland Government has already issued $500,000 in disaster relief grants to farmers.

The NFU said the government should take more steps to help farmers.

“This is one of the worst droughty conditions in Queensland’s history,” Mr McKeeson said.